Submissions

Submitting to Conjunctions

PRINT ISSUE

We will accept submissions for our fall 2024 print issue, Conjunctions:83, Revenants, The Ghost Issue, via Submittable from May 13 – June 1, 2024. All submissions will also be considered for our weekly online magazine.

Note: If you miss the Submittable window, we are also open for submissions by postal mail year-round. Please see below for instructions.


ONLINE MAGAZINE

Submissions are open year-round by postal mail for our biannual print issues and weekly online magazine, which is not subject to thematic restrictions. Please see below for instructions.
 

HOW TO SUBMIT

Submissions are open year-round by postal mail. To submit via mail, please send your manuscript to our editorial office (address below) with a brief cover letter including your name, address, and email. In order to receive a response, you must include a self-addressed envelope stamped with sufficient postage for our reply and for return of your manuscript (if requested). Do not send submissions by any delivery method that requires a signature. 
 
Address mail submissions to:       Bradford Morrow, Editor
Conjunctions
21 E 10th Street, #3E
New York, NY 10003

While we can’t predict exactly when an issue will close to new work, we typically read into August for our fall issues and into February for our spring issues.

Submissions will also be accepted electronically via Submittable twice a year, during our fall and winter reading periods. Please check back here or follow us on Facebook and Twitter or subscribe to our newsletter for the earliest information about our reading periods for each issue.

If you'd like to submit to Conjunctions outside of our fall and spring Submittable periods, please submit via postal mail. 
 

WHAT TO SUBMIT

Conjunctions publishes short- and long-form fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and hybrid texts. We do not publish academic essays or book reviews.

All submissions must be in English and previously unpublished. We will consider works in translation for which the translator has secured the rights.

Although we have no official restrictions regarding word count, most of the manuscripts we select for publication are under eight thousand words long. For poetry submissions, we suggest sending half a dozen poems, depending on length.

We strongly suggest that writers new to Conjunctions read our recent issues to acquaint themselves with our publications. Subscriptions are available here.
 

ACCESSING CONJUNCTIONS

Are you familiar with our work? Sign up for our newsletter to read new writing in our online magazine every week, subscribe to our print biannual, or order a back issue.

If a disability prevents you from using Submittable, please call 845-758-7054 or email [email protected].

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Submissions

In Print

Vol. 82
Works & Days
Spring 2024
Bradford Morrow

Online

May 22, 2024
Now that the bumblebees are sounding in the yard, sprint to the garden store in your tank top with your poodle as if there is a headwind. Stub a toe. Hear the tick of the clock as you place your items on the trolley: a new houseplant, two and three: a philodendron since you already have a few and they grow so nicely. Pay for mulch. Get some stones while you’re at it. Some daisies for the back. Black-eyed Susans too.
May 15, 2024
The boy watches me tend the fry pan. First of November in a warm year. I was an old man this morning. Now it is night and I am still an old man. The good stink of hot fried whitefish rises in the kitchen and oak leaves have fallen, painted the hill red. I am an old man because my body does not move fast. I am an old man because I have seen change that is large enough to fit inside my body. The change I have seen is like a bent stick I have swallowed. It sits inside my chest. It might make a hole in something soon.
May 8, 2024
Why my mother don’t like me?
     I ask Ansin, my grandmother. I say, How it is my mother never did like me?
     She steups. Kiss she teeth. And smooth-out that news she was reading in. Raise it up again to give it a little flip. At the top. And you could feel the vexness in that flip too.
     I say, Is cause I ent got no father?