Submissions

Submitting to Conjunctions

PRINT ISSUE

We are now reading for our fall 2021 issue, Conjunctions:77, States of Play: The Games Issue.

Daily, we find ourselves caught up in vortices of every imaginable kind of game. Word games and war games. Shell games and waiting games.
Schoolyard games, mind games, shadow games, games of chance. There are game theories, confidence games, and those who would try to game the system, which is, to some, fair game. One can beat another at her, his, or their own game, or give the game away. And as for love, the old torch-song standard reminds us,
Many a tear has to fall, but it’s all in the game.

In this issue, we will explore the myriad games we engage in, the games that rule our lives, and the spectrum  of results, from joyous to tragic, that they yield.


ONLINE MAGAZINE

Submissions are open for our weekly online magazine, which we read for year-round and is not subject to thematic restrictions.
 

HOW TO SUBMIT

To submit via mail, please send your manuscript to our editorial office (address below) with a brief cover letter including your name, address, and email. In order to receive a response, you must include a self-addressed envelope stamped with sufficient postage for our reply and for return of your manuscript (if requested). Do not send submissions by any delivery method that requires a signature. 
 
Address mail submissions to:       Bradford Morrow, Editor
Conjunctions
21 E 10th Street, #3E
New York, NY 10003

While we can’t predict exactly when an issue will close to new work, we typically read into August for our fall issues and into February for our spring issues.

To submit electronically, please see our Submittable page. Submissions via Submittable will reopen in fall 2021.
 

WHAT TO SUBMIT

Conjunctions publishes short- and long-form fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and hybrid texts. We do not publish academic essays or book reviews.

All submissions must be in English and previously unpublished. We will consider works in translation for which the translator has secured the rights.

Although we have no official restrictions regarding word count, most of the manuscripts we select for publication are under eight thousand words long. For poetry submissions, we suggest sending half a dozen poems, depending on length.

We strongly suggest that writers new to Conjunctions read our recent issues to acquaint themselves with our publications. Subscriptions are available here.
 

ACCESSING CONJUNCTIONS

Are you familiar with our work? Sign up for our newsletter to read new writing in our online magazine every week, subscribe to our print biannual, or order a back issue.

If a disability prevents you from using Submittable, please call 845-758-7054 or email conjunctions@bard.edu.

Love our publications? Support Conjunctions by making a tax-deductible donation. Thanks to a generous grant from the Whiting Foundation, up to $5,000 in donations will be tripled by a matching contribution from the Foundation.

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Submissions

In Print

Vol. 76
Fortieth Anniversary Issue
Spring 2021
Edited by Bradford Morrow

Online

August 11, 2021
The property consisted of a small washout pond, several tin structures, and a ranch house with a wraparound porch. The landlord was a tall tan man with silver hair and great big hands, impressive even in his early seventies. He spoke in fast and stuttered rhythms that made me want to clutch the dirt and hang on, but walked at a pace which indicated there was no other place he’d rather be in that moment than with me, touring his property, him explaining to me his rules.
August 4, 2021
I spot wind at the Texas inn where 
my brother plays charcuterie, his head glowing with sweat.

As he peers into the cheese, my oblong sister
offers her face to violent vegetarians

and prognosticates the part about the bison;
indeed, this bison will have denied paradise to us

before we have even eaten. 
July 28, 2021
Sanjay’s stepmother enters the dining room and
his monitoring bracelet records a flutter in his pulse.
Dr. Cameron shows the assistant how he applies
an electrode to the surface of the patient’s brain.
She sees a mountain blow away like it’s sand.
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