News and Events

See all News and Events

A Reading by Joanna Scott
The Pulitzer Prize and PEN/Faulkner Award finalist Joanna Scott reads from her work, followed by a conversation with Dinaw Mengestu
Monday, April 1, 2019
7:00 pm – 8:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Reem-Kayden Center Laszlo Z. Bito '60 Auditorium
 [A Reading by Joanna Scott] On Monday, April 1, at 7:00 p.m. in the László Z. Bitó ’60 Auditorium, Reem-Kayden Center (RKC), novelist Joanna Scott reads from her work. Presented by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by novelist and Bard literature and writing professor Mary Caponegro, and followed by a conversation with Dinaw Mengestu, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Books by Joanna Scott will be available for sale, courtesy of Oblong Books & Music.

Exploring subjects ranging from beauty and temptation to the motion of thought and the elusive potential of the imagination, Joanna Scott’s publications include Various Antidotes: Stories and the novel Arrogance, both PEN/Faulkner finalists; The Manikin, a Pulitzer Prize finalist; and Follow Me, a New York Times Notable Book. Her most recent novels are Careers for Women (2017) and De Potter's Grand Tour (2014). Scott has written about modern and contemporary authors including Samuel Beckett, Virginia Woolf, W. G. Sebald, Maureen Howard, William Gass, and J.M. Coetzee. Her play, Speakeasy, was produced by the Todd Theater Troupe at La MaMa and toured fringe festivals around the world.

Scott founded and directs The Inspiration Project, a volunteer literacy program for adults with developmental disabilities. She is a founding board member of the literary press Open Letter, and she is a contributing editor of Bard’s literary journal, Conjunctions, which published her story “Infidels” in the Fall 2018 issue, Conjunctions:71, A Cabinet of Curiosity.

Scott received her master’s degree from Brown University and has taught creative writing at Brown, the University of Maryland, and Princeton University; she is currently the Roswell Smith Burrows Professor of English at the University of Rochester. Scott is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Ambassador Book Award from the English-Speaking Union, and the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.
 
PRAISE FOR JOANNA SCOTT
 
“The wit, the magical prose and the daring devices of Scott’s writing create an enchantment . . . her soundings of the depth of our natures are as accurate and revealing as Thoreau’s measurements of Walden Pond.” Nation

“A greatly gifted and highly original artist.” New York Times Book Review

“Scott writes with the crispest and most telling of sentences. Her grasp of the mysteries within us is profound.” Newsday

“Scott’s prose is sensitive and beautifully crafted . . . Her characters are both eminently human and touched with magic and mystery.” Washington Post Book World

“One of the finest writers of her generation: elegant, sublime, of the earthy earth.” —Paul West

“What most amazes me about Joanna Scott’s extraordinary narratives is the vastness of the world her imagination ranges through and the rich, Dickensian variety of voices and characters one encounters.” —Robert Coover

Contact: Nicole Nyhan, [email protected], 845-758-7054

Connect

e-mail
Submissions

In Print

Vol. 82
Works & Days
Spring 2024
Bradford Morrow

Online

June 19, 2024
I am sorry for not writing sooner. To be completely frank, I was afraid of receiving a response and knowing for certain that you’re finished with me. I am very troubled by the way we’ve left things.
 
June 12, 2024
It took place in London at the end of the seventeenth century—a man was spending the evening at home, often thinking of a friend of his, a woman, who was very ill, worrying about her, hoping she would live, when there was a knock on the door, and she entered, looking fine, thriving, in fact, and sat down in a normal way and began a normal conversation, though she seemed a little more serious than usual until he began to cry, at which she continued quietly, discussing things of the soul, aspects of time, and he began to sob, and she continued speaking quietly, as he sobbed and sobbed, and when he finally looked up she was gone.
June 5, 2024
I’ll just speak for myself. This seems to be the best plan. When you try to speak on behalf of others you run into trouble. See? Already I has become you, but I cannot be you. But you can come along with me, at my side if you like, even if my walk is a bit awkward and you probably want to move more quickly over the terrain. Probably you wouldn’t say “terrain.” You would say ground or path or street. These choices don’t amount to a disagreement, just a different habit of mind. The mind’s terrain. Just now my mind’s terrain is a bit foggy, a bit dreary. It feels, inside of this fog, quite empty, as if, when the fog lifts, there will be nothing but an expanse uninflected by things to see or do, undisturbed by names and places, recollections and glimpses into other times and other places.