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A Reading by Laura van den Berg
The Bard Fiction Prize winner Laura van den Berg reads from her work.
Monday, April 2, 2018
2:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
Campus Center, Weis Cinema
 [A Reading by Laura van den Berg] On Monday, April 2, at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center, novelist and story writer Laura van den Berg reads from her work. Presented by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by novelist and Bard literature professor Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

Laura van den Berg is the author of the novel Find Me (2015), which was long-listed for the 2016 International Dylan Thomas Prize and selected as a Best Book of the Year by Time Out New York and NPR. She is also the author of two story collections, What the World Will Look Like When All the Water Leaves Us (2009) and The Isle of Youth (2013), both finalists for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. Her honors include the Bard Fiction Prize, the Rosenthal Family Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Pushcart Prize, an O. Henry Award, and fellowships from the MacDowell Colony and the Civitella Ranieri Foundation; her fiction has been anthologized in The Best American Short Stories. Her next novel, The Third Hotel, is forthcoming from Farrar, Straus and Giroux in August 2018. She is a Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in Fiction at Harvard University.
 
PRAISE FOR LAURA VAN DEN BERG
 
“Van den Berg spins complex plots around a sense of emotional emptiness. Her stories are bursting at the seams.” —The New York Times

“Van den Berg somehow packs a duffel bag of plot into carry-on-size stories. She also has the right kind of range: from brutal to moving to funny, South America to Paris to Antarctica, really great to freaking outstanding.” ―New York Magazine

“I love Laura van den Berg for her eeriness and her elegance, the way the fabric of her stories is woven on a slightly warped loom so that you read her work always a bit perturbed.” ―Lauren Groff, author of Fates and Furies

“Laura van den Berg is one of our best writers, an absolute marvel.” ―Garth Greenwell, author of What Belongs to You

Contact: Nicole Nyhan, [email protected], 845-758-7054

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In Print

Vol. 79
Onword
Fall 2022
Edited by Bradford Morrow

Online

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