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A Celebration of Poet and Essayist Ann Lauterbach
Thursday, April 21, 2016
6:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Campus Center, Multipurpose Room
 [A Celebration of Poet and Essayist Ann Lauterbach] Save the Date: Ann Lauterbach Celebration

Please join us at 6:00 p.m. on April 21st at the Bertelsmann Campus Center’s Multipurpose Room for a celebratory reading of the work of Ann Lauterbach, David and Ruth Schwab Professor of Languages and Literature, member of the Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts faculty, and the renowned author of Under the Sign; Or to Begin Again (National Book Award nominee); Hum; If in Time: Selected Poems 1975–2000The Night Sky: Writings on the Poetics of Experience; and other books.

Celebrating Ann’s work will be the poets Jibade-Khalil Huffman ’03, Simone White, Michael Ives, Camille Guthrie, and Anselm Berrigan, who will briefly discuss their artistic relationship to Lauterbach’s influential oeuvre. The reading will culminate with Ann reading her own work.

Presented by the Bard Institute of Writing and Thinking, the literary journal Conjunctions, and the Bard Division of Languages and Literature, the celebration is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required. Available for sale and signing will be limited-edition broadsides of Ann's work, exclusively produced for this event by Ugly Duckling Presse; and copies of her books from Oblong Books & Music.

This event is part of the annual IWT April Conference, which this year engages the theme “The Difficulty with Poetry: Opacity and Implication in the New and Old” and features the e-book edition of Conjunctions’ landmark American Poetry issue. Registration is open for the Friday, April 22nd conference, which will include a panel on “Difficulty” at 11am in Olin Auditorium. Panelists will include Ann Lauterbach, Charles Bernstein, and Simone White. The conference also includes a series of writing-based workshops on poetry and difficulty led by IWT Faculty Associates. For more information, see https://iwt.bard.eduportfolio-items/conference-april-2016/​.

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PRAISE FOR ANN LAUTERBACH

“The mystery and longing in Ann Lauterbach’s work, the wit and heart are the things we feel on our skin.” —Don DeLillo

“Lauterbach has found new forms for expressing the continuousness of change: its ways of summoning and disrupting intimacy, of evoking and subverting the position of perceptions and the framing and decentering play of language itself.” —Boston Review

“Ann Lauterbach’s poetry goes straight to the elastic, infinite core of time.” —John Ashbery

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, [email protected], 845-758-7054

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