Advertise with Us

Conjunctions offers print and online advertising opportunities. For all advertisements, invoices are issued upon receipt of the ad, and payment is due prior to ad publication.

 
ONLINE ADVERTISING

To ensure maximum exposure, each ad featured on Conjunctions’ website appears on our homepage, on the front pages of our Online, Selected Texts, and Multimedia sections, and on all conjunctions.com pages within our Store, Advertise, About Us, and Support sections. Reservations for online ad space may be made at any time by emailing conjunctions@bard.edu.

Online ad rates

  • One month: $300
  • Two months: $500

Online ad specs

  • Format: JPG, GIF, or TIFF
  • Color: RGB
  • Ad height: 227 pixels (a small amount of wiggle room is allowed for ad height)
  • Ad width: exactly 271 pixels
  • Resolution: 72ppi
 
PRINT ADVERTISING
Ad space is available in each spring and fall issue of Conjunctions. For spring issues, ads must be received by March 1, and we recommend reserving space no later than February 1. For fall issues, ads must be received by September 1, and we recommend reserving ad space no later than August 1.
 

Print ad rates

  • Full-page ad: $150
  • Two facing full-page ads: $250


Print ad specs

  • Format: TIFF (preferred) or JPG only—no PDFs, please
  • Color: CMYK grayscale / B&W
  • Ad dimensions: exactly 4.5"W X 7.5"H, (Trim size: 6"W X 9"H)
  • Resolution: Minimum 300ppi

Please contact us if you are interested in placing an ad, or if you wish to be advised of the themes or contributors for upcoming issues.

Connect

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Submissions

In Print

Vol. 71
A Cabinet of Curiosity
Fall 2018
Edited by Bradford Morrow

Online

January 15, 2019
Outside the stars were fading and the sky was slowly rosying at the edges when we found the skeleton. At first it was visible only as a clutch of white daggers, thickly clotted with spiderwebs, compressed between the plaster wall and the heavy wooden timbers. I don’t know what I expected it to be.
January 8, 2019
On the bus, we were told to remember everything, to testify, testify, testify. We’d heard this many times before. Remember and testify, they would say, in order that this or that bad thing does not happen again. I harbored no such faith in remembering. Nor in testimony. I fail to believe in them still.
January 1, 2019
Someone shouted at me to grab a blanket or a coat or something for crissakes, the narrator of The Bystander says, and wrap your old man up, because after assaulting the woman the narrator’s father liked best, and after running out with nothing on but the soap from the bath he’d been taking with her, the narrator’s father is standing on the street, shouting imprecations at her,
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