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Now accepting submissions for Conjunctions:70, Sanctuary: The Preservation Issue

Approximate deadline:
Thursday, February 1, 2018
What seems most permanent is only permanently fragile. Cultures, societies, ecologies, the arts and sciences, histories, governments, the very Earth itself can be eroded or erased far more quickly than the time it took for them to come into being. Once compromised, can they be salvaged, renewed? Things fall apart, to be sure, but they sometimes can be saved.

Conjunctions:70, Sanctuary: The Preservation Issue, explores the myriad ways in which we go about preserving what might otherwise be forfeited. Whether trained specialists or lay people who care about something, preservationists come from every stratum of life. The archivist, the linguist, the local town historian. The paleontologist, the heirloom seed-saver, the family photographer, the Monument Men. Old two-by-two Noah and taxonomist Linnaeus. The suburban girl who collects enough yard sale books to build up a library and thereby safeguards that most fragile of things—knowledge. All can be preservationists.

For our mailing address and other important submission guidelines, please consult http://www.conjunctions.com/about/submissions/. We cannot predict exactly when the Sanctuary issue will close, but we expect to read submissions through approximately February 1, 2018.

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, Managing Editor, conjunctions@bard.edu

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Submissions

In Print

Vol. 68
Inside Out: Architectures of Experience
Spring 2017
Edited by Bradford Morrow

Online

October 17, 2017
Cycles of sleep and waking. Birds migrating from cold region to warm. The rate of polar ice melting. Or the beat of iambs or the subtler pulse of prose.
October 10, 2017
Let me say this one thing, that the meteor is a woman of varying biologies and the crocuses are rising up. In only three words I can convey a schism: x, y, z. Insert here for pleasure.
October 3, 2017
Here is Pitkin Plaza, three boys
sharing a cigarette, antibodies
bound to platelets that fuzzed-out guitars
in headphones eliminate.
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The celebrated author reads from The Zookeeper’s Wife
Monday, October 30, 2017
2:30 pm
Campus Center, Weis Cinema