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A Conjunctions Reading by Amy England & A. D. Jameson
The fourth reading in the Cities Series, presented by Conjunctions and the Bard Office of Alumni/ae Affairs, takes place at Myopic Books in Chicago
Saturday, August 26, 2017
7:00 pm EDT/GMT-4
Myopic Books, 1564 N. Milwaukee Ave., Wicker Park, Chicago

 
On Saturday, August 26, at 7:00 p.m., Myopic Books celebrates the literary journal Conjunctions with a reading by contributors Amy England and A. D. Jameson at 1564 North Milwaukee Avenue. Copies of Conjunctions:68, Inside Out: Architectures of Experience will be available for sale. The event is free and open to the public; seating is first-come / first-served. RSVP on Facebook.

The literary journal Conjunctions, edited by novelist Bradford Morrow and published by Bard College, has been a living notebook for provocative, innovative, immaculately crafted fiction, poetry, and narrative nonfiction since 1981. As Karen Russell has said, “Conjunctions is a translation into a multiverse of stories and poems and essays and even weirder hybrid forms, the mutant menagerie of literary fiction. I read it with Christmas pleasure.” Rick Moody agrees: “Without a doubt, Conjunctions is the best literary magazine in America.”

Located in the heart of Wicker Park, Myopic Books has been voted Chicago’s favorite and best used bookstore by Chicago Magazine, Chicago Reader, and Concierge Preferred. With music and poetry series, over seventy thousand books, and incredible staff recommendations, it's long been at the heart of the Chicago’s independent literary community. Myopic’s thriving Saturday poetry reading series, curated by poet and milkmag.org editor Larry Sawyer since 2004, has recently featured authors such as Eileen Myles, Ron Silliman, Bernadette Mayer, and Tim Kinsella.

Note that this event’s second-floor venue may not be accessible to those with mobility impairments. If you wish to attend but are restricted from doing so by the stair access, please let us know at conjunctions@bard.edu.
 
ABOUT THE READERS

AMY ENGLAND is the author of The Flute Ship Castricum, Victory and Her Opposites: A Guide (both Tupelo), and the book of collages For the Reckless Sleeper (American Letters and Commentary). Her work has appeared in numerous journals, including Conjunctions’ online edition, and her anthology publications include Robert Hass’s 2001 edition of Best American Poetry. She is the editor of the poetry chapbook publisher Transparent Tiger Press, and teaches poetics, surrealism, and writing at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
 
“Place and motion, place in motion, and the place of motion in our lives—Amy England’s work grapples with these issues, and through them, with the issue of presence. These poems are the present, and the reader becomes more present within them. Whether it’s Japan or Chicago, the white rooms of an empty house or the empty walls of a monastery, a vivid magical-realist sense of possibility laces these evocative locations together—swiftly— England’s work is a new form of traveling.” —Cole Swensen

 
***

 
A. D. JAMESON is the author of five books, including Cinemaps, a collaboration with artist Andrew DeGraff, forthcoming in late October 2017 from Quirk Books, as well as a critical book on geek culture, forthcoming in 2018 from FSG. He’s currently a PhD candidate at the University of Illinois in Chicago, where he teaches writing and film studies, and is finishing his dissertation, a collection of five hundred short fantasy, horror, and science-fiction stories. His writing has appeared in Conjunctions:57, Kin and elsewhere.

“A. D. Jameson is a pretty much a monster when it comes to corrupting familiar characters, folding, spindling and mutilating existing forms, and generally bankrupting your appreciation of traditional narrative.”  —H_NGM_N
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, conjunctions@bard.edu, 845-758-7054

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Vol. 76
Fortieth Anniversary Issue
Spring 2021
Edited by Bradford Morrow

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