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A Reading by Paul Lisicky
The 2016 Guggenheim fellow reads from his memoir The Narrow Door
Monday, April 10, 2017
2:30 pm EDT/GMT-4
Campus Center, Weis Cinema
 [A Reading by Paul Lisicky] The author of Lawnboy reads from his new memoir, The Narrow Door, at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, April 10th, 2017, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

PAUL LISICKY is the author of The Narrow Door, Unbuilt Projects, The Burning House, Famous Builder, and Lawnboy, and the editor of StoryQuarterly. A 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, he has also received awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the James Michener/Copernicus Society, the Corporation of Yaddo, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. He currently teaches in the MFA Program at Rutgers University-Camden, the low residency program at Sierra Nevada College, and at the Juniper Summer Writing Institute.

Read his work in Conjunctions’ weekly online magazine, and read and hear his contribution to Conjunctions:61, A Menagerie.

PRAISE FOR PAUL LISICKY

“Intelligent and intimate, fierce and tender, real and raw, Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door is an unforgettable memoir about love and loss, friendship and forgiveness. It had me in its thrall from page one.”—Cheryl Strayed

“You know you’re reading an exceptional book when, approximately two sentences into it, you start panicking at the thought of its ending. Be forewarned: this is likely to happen to you, as it did to me, reading the opening pages of The Narrow Door, the achingly gorgeous, wildly ambitious memoir by Paul Lisicky.” —Chicago Tribune

“Paul Lisicky’s The Narrow Door circumvents the often inscrutable forces that bring us in and out of each other’s lives and hearts, while paying welcome homage to the oft-unsung role of friendship in them. While Lisicky bears witness to ‘the hell of wanting [that] has no cure,’ his ship always feels buoyant, by virtue of a narrator whose attentiveness to feelings both big and small is marked throughout by honesty and devotion.” —Maggie Nelson

Any supporter who donates $500 or more to Bard’s literary journal Conjunctions receives a BackPage Pass providing VIP access to any Spring/Fall 2017 or future event in the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series. Have lunch with a visiting author, attend a seminar on their work, and receive premium seating at their reading. Or you can give your BackPage Pass to a lover of literature on your gift list! To find out more, click here or contact Micaela Morrissette at conjunctions@bard.edu or (845) 758-7054.

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, mmorriss@bard.edu, 845-758-7054

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Vol. 76
Fortieth Anniversary Issue
Spring 2021
Edited by Bradford Morrow

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