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A Reading by John Crowley
The winner of the World Fantasy Award reads from new fiction
Monday, November 14, 2016
2:30 pm EST/GMT-5
Campus Center, Weis Cinema
 [A Reading by John Crowley] The World Fantasy Award–winning author of Little, Big and the Ægypt series reads from his fiction at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, November 14th, 2016, in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Sponsored by the Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series, introduced by Bradford Morrow, and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

PRAISE FOR JOHN CROWLEY

"Little, Big is a book that all by itself calls for a redefinition of fantasy." —Ursula K. Le Guin

"John Crowley writes sentences of such coruscating magnificence that the rest of the English language has fallen in love with them. I once knew an adverbial clause who was so infatuated with the linguistic beauty of Little, Big that the poor creature pined away into a comma." —James Morrow

"Crowley is generous, obsessed, fascinating, gripping. Really, I think Crowley is so good that he has left everybody else in the dust." —Peter Straub

"Dæmonomania is a prophecy of America entering the authentic new age: Magical, potentially destructive, and utterly uncanny." —Harold Bloom

"John Crowley is an abundantly gifted writer, a scholar whose passion for history is matched by his ability to write a graceful sentence." —New York Times Book Review

"Ambitious, dazzling, strangely moving. Haunting. Gripping. Astonishing." —Washington Post Book World

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, mmorriss@bard.edu, 845-758-7054

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Vol. 77
States of Play: The Games Issue
Fall 2021
Bradford Morrow

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