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The Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series Presents Andrew Ervin
The author reads from his debut novel, Burning Down George Orwell’s House
Monday, September 26, 2016
2:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Campus Center, Weis Cinema
Photo (c) Angelia Bautista [The Innovative Contemporary Fiction Reading Series Presents Andrew Ervin] On Monday, September 26th, at 2:30 p.m., Andrew Ervin reads from Burning Down George Orwell’s House in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations are required.

“Beyond being a vastly entertaining novel, cunningly observed and delicately flavored with the very finest Scotch whisky on the planet, Burning Down George Orwell’s House is a serious meditation on just how Orwellian our world has really become. Let Andrew Ervin help you imagine your way to a world beyond Big Brother.”
—Madison Smartt Bell

Burning Down George Orwell’s House is a sweet book full of delights. Since many of its best passages are rhapsodies on single malt whiskies, one is tempted to call it a wee bonny dram of a tale.”
—Christopher Buckley, New York Times Book Review

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, conjunctions@bard.edu, 845-758-7054
http://andrewervin.com/

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Vol. 71
A Cabinet of Curiosity
Fall 2018
Edited by Bradford Morrow

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