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A Reading by Noy Holland
Monday, February 29, 2016
2:30 pm – 3:45 pm EDT/GMT-4
Campus Center, Weis Cinema
 [A Reading by Noy Holland] The National Book Award nominee and author of BirdSpectacle of the BodyWhat Begins with Bird, and Swim for the Little One First reads from her work at 2:30 p.m. in Weis Cinema, Bertelsmann Campus Center. Introduced by Bradford Morrow and followed by a Q&A, the reading is free and open to the public; no tickets or reservations required.

"Ms. Holland habitually challenges the usual limits of language, but the effects of her exuberance are never precious, and often turn suddenly into beauty; her characters portray themselves in a discourse that is startling but genuine, the secret syntax of real lives." —New York Times Book Review

"Noy Holland animates what we struggle to keep unknown, the suppressed, the barely to be borne, in a prismatic, restless language that illuminates a heaven and hell of visions and want." —Joy Williams

"Strange, glittering, incantatory language marks Holland's provocative, nearly hypnotic stories." —Publishers Weekly

"The syncopated rhythms of Noy Holland’s rapturous prose jolt the heart and spark the senses." —Melanie Rae Thon

 

Contact: Micaela Morrissette, mmorriss@bard.edu, 845-758-7054

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Vol. 74
Grendel’s Kin: The Monsters Issue
Spring 2020
Edited by Bradford Morrow

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