Contributors

Fyodor Dostoevsky
Contributor History

Biography
Fyodor Dostoevsky’s (1821–1881) first novel, Poor Folk, was published in 1846 to great acclaim. In the early 1860s he edited two magazines, Time and Epoch, in collaboration with his brother Mikhail. Both magazines were closed by the censors, and in 1864 his wife and brother both died, leaving him in charge of their families and deeply in debt. In that same year he wrote Notes from Underground, which was the prelude to the five great novels that crowned his work: Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), Demons (1872), The Adolescent (1875), and The Brothers Karamazov (1880).

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In Print

Vol. 68
Inside Out: Architectures of Experience
Spring 2017
Edited by Bradford Morrow

Online

by Matthias Göritz
Translated by Mary Jo Bang
September 19, 2017
There where the night broke an arm
on the lamp at the end of the houses
I explain silence
September 12, 2017
this body I can’t find

is just a crow my eye was following until it slipped
through sky’s white crease
September 5, 2017
That is the true philosophical paradox: not how you can travel from point A to point B without first traversing a spatial infinity, bridging all the subdivisible points between them; but rather, how you can travel from mind A to mind B without first traversing a psychological infinity. Leaving the apartment in one frame of mind, how could you ever arrive at a new one?
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The American Book Award–winning poet, journalist, and Miles Davis biographer reads from his work
Monday, September 25, 2017
2:30 pm
Campus Center, Weis Cinema